The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Interessante und neue Themen aus "Wissenschaft und Medien"

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Sonntag 14. April 2019, 22:06

From: AntWiki - Where Ant Biologists Share Their Knowledge.

Hölldobler, B. and Wilson, E. O. 1990. The Ants. Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press. Text used with permission of the authors.

From Chapter 12:

The “ultimate” social parasite.

There is no better way to begin a survey of the social symbioses than by considering the most extreme example known, that of the “ultimate” parasitic ant Teleutomyrmex schneideri. This remarkable species was discovered by Heinrich Kutter (1950a) at Saas-Fee, in an isolated valley of the Swiss Alps near Zermatt. Its behavior has been studied by Stumper (1950) and Kutter (1969), its neuroanatomy by Brun (1952), and its general anatomy and histology by Gösswald (1953). A second population has been reported from near Briançon in the French Alps by Collingwood (1956), a third in the French Pyrenees by Buschinger (1987c), and still others in the Spanish Sierra Nevada by Tinaut Ranera (1981). Appropriately, the name Teleutomyrmex means “final ant.”
The populations of Teleutomyrmex schneideri, like those of most workerless parasitic ant species (Wilson, 1963), are small and isolated. The Swiss population appears to be limited to the eastern slope of the Saas Valley, in juniper-Arctostaphylos woodland ranging from 1,800 to 2,300 m in elevation. The ground is covered by thick leaf litter and sprinkled with rocks of various sizes, providing, in short, an ideal environment for ants The ant fauna is of a typically boreal European complexion, comprising the following free-living species listed in the order of their abundance (Stumper, 1950): Formica fusca, Formica lugubris, Tetramorium caespitum, Leptothorax acervorum, Leptothorax tuberum, Camponotus ligniperda, Myrmica lobicornis, Myrmixa sulcinodis, Camponotus herculeanus, Formica sanguinea, Formica rufibarbis, Formica pressilabris, and Manica rubida. For some unexplained reason this little assemblage is extremely prone to social parasitism. Formica sanguinea is a facultative slavemaking species, preying on the other species of Formica. Doronomyrmex pacis, a workerless parasite living with Leptothorax acervorum, was discovered by Kutter as a genus new to science in the Saas-Fee forest in 1945. In addition, Kutter and Stumper found Epimyrma stumperi in nests of Leptothorax tuberum, as well as two parasitic Leptothorax, goesswaldi and kutteri, in nests of Leptothorax acervorum (Kutter, 1969).
Teleutomyrmex schneideri is a parasite of Tetramorium caespitum and Tetramorium impurum. Like so many other social parasites, it is phylogenetically closer to its host than to any of the other members of the ant fauna to which it belongs. In fact, it may have been derived directly from a temporarily free-living offshoot of this species, since Tetramorium caespitum and Tetramorium impurum (the host species at Briançon and in the Pyrenees) are the only nonparasitic tetramoriines known to exist at the present time through most of central Europe. It is difficult to conceive of a stage of social parasitism more advanced than that actually reached by Teleutomyrmex schneideri. The species occurs only in the nests of its hosts. It lacks a worker caste, and the queens contribute in no visibly productive way to the economy of the host colonies. The queens are tiny compared with most ants, especially other tetramoriines; they average only about 2.5 mm in total length. They are unique among all known social insects in being ectoparasitic. In other words, they spend much of their time riding on the backs of their hosts (Figure 12-1). The Teleutomyrmex queens display several striking morphological features that are correlated with this peculiar habit. The ventral surface of the gaster (the large terminal part of the body) is strongly concave, permitting the parasites to press their bodies close to those of their hosts. The tarsal claws and arolia are unusually large, permitting the parasites to secure a strong grip on the smooth chitinous body surface of the hosts. The queens have a marked tendency to grasp objects. Given a choice, they will position themselves on the top of the body of the host queen, either on the thorax or the abdomen. Deprived of the nest queen, they will then seize a virgin Tetramorium queen, or a worker, or a pupa, or even a dead queen or worker. Stumper observed a case in which six to eight Teleutomyrmex queens simultaneously grasped one Tetramorium queen, completely immobilizing her. The mode of feeding of the Teleutomyrmex is not known with certainty. The adults are evidently either fed by the host workers through direct regurgitation or else share in the liquid regurgitated to the host queen. In any case, they are almost completely inactive most of the time. The Teleutomyrmex adults, especially the older queens, are highly attractive to the host workers, who lick them frequently. According to Gösswald, large numbers of unicellular glands are located just under the cuticle of the thorax, pedicel, and abdomen of the queens; these are associated with glandular hairs and are believed to be the source of a special attractant for the host workers. The abdomens of older Teleutomyrmex queens become swollen with fat body and ovarioles, as is shown in Figure 12-1. This physogastry is made possible by the fact that the intersegmental membranes are thicker and more sclerotized than is usually the case in ant queens and can therefore be stretched more. Also, the abdominal sclerites themselves are widely overlapping in the virgin queen, so that the abdomen can be distended to an unusual degree before the sclerites are pulled apart. The ovarioles increase enormously in length, discard their initial orientation, and infiltrate the entire abdomen and even the postpetiolar cavity.
From one to several physogastric queens are found in each parasitized nest, usually riding on the back of the host queen. Each lays an average of one egg every thirty seconds. The infested Tetramorium colonies are typically smaller than uninfested ones, but they still contain up to several thousand workers. The Tetramorium queens also lay eggs, and these are capable of developing into either workers or sexual forms (Buschinger, personal communication). Consequently the brood of a parasitized colony consists typically of eggs, larvae, and pupae of Teleutomyrmex queens and males mixed with those of Tetramorium workers.
The bodies of the Teleutomyrmex queens bear the mark of extensive morphological degeneration correlated with their loss of social functions. The labial and postpharyngeal glands are reduced, and the maxillary and metapleural glands are completely absent. The mandibular glands, on the other hand, are apparently normal. In addition, the queens possess a tibial gland, the function of which is unknown. The integument is thin and less pigmented and sculptured in comparison with that of Tetramorium; as a result of these reductions the queens are shining brown, an appearance that contrasts with the opaque blackish brown of their hosts. The sting and poison apparatus are reduced; the mandibles are so degenerate that the parasites are probably unable to secure food on their own; the tibial-tarsal cleaning apparatus is underdeveloped; and, of even greater interest, the brain is reduced in size with visible degeneration in the associative centers. In the central nerve cord, ganglia 9-13 are fused into a single piece. The males are also degenerate. Their bodies, like those of the males of a few other extreme social parasites, are “pupoid,” meaning that the cuticle is thin and depigmented, actually greyish in color; the petiole and postpetiole are thick and provided with broad articulating surfaces; and the abdomen is soft and deflected downward at the tip.
In its essentials the life cycle of Teleutomyrmex schneideri resembles that of other known extreme ant parasites. Mating takes place within the host nest. The fecundated queens then either shed their wings and join the small force of egg layers within the home nest or else fly out in search of new Tetramorium nests to infest. Stumper found that the queens could be transferred readily from one Tetramorium colony to another, provided the recipient colony originated from the Saas-Fee. However, Tetramorium colonies from Luxembourg were hostile to the little parasites. Less surprisingly, ant species from the Saas-Fee other than Tetramorium caespitum always rejected the Teleutomyrmex. However, Buschinger (personal communication) has pointed out that the Saas-Fee population could be caespitum or impurum, or a mixture of both. In other words, the transfer might have been attempted across species.
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Montag 15. April 2019, 23:02

A few pictures from Goesswald, 1953...
  • 2

Dateianhänge
scannenz0001.jpg
scannenz0002.jpg
scannenz0003.jpg
scannenz0004.jpg
scannenz0005.jpg
scannenz0006.jpg
scannenz0007.jpg
scannenz0008.jpg
scannenz0009.jpg
Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Mittwoch 17. April 2019, 11:51

And the famous Linsenmaier….
  • 1

Dateianhänge
tschneideri05.jpg
Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Mittwoch 17. April 2019, 12:05

And Tinaut...
  • 0

Dateianhänge
tkutteri01.jpg
tkutteri02.jpg
tkutteri03.jpg
tkutteriph01.jpg
tkutteriph02.jpg
tkutteriph03.jpg
Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Mittwoch 17. April 2019, 12:40

And Kiran et al.....
  • 0

Dateianhänge
Foto 1.jpg
Foto 2.jpg
Foto 3.jpg
Foto 4.jpg
Foto 5.jpg
Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Sonntag 28. April 2019, 22:59

The original photographs from AntCat:
  • 2

Dateianhänge
Teleutomyrmex_schneideri_casent0101582_head_1.jpg
Teleutomyrmex_schneideri_casent0101582_profile_1.jpg
Teleutomyrmex_schneideri_casent0101582_dorsal_1.jpg
Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Sonntag 19. Mai 2019, 18:09

From: AntWiki - Where Ant Biologists Share Their Knowledge.

Hölldobler, B. and Wilson, E. O. 1990. The Ants. Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press. Text used with permission of the authors.

When do we know an ant is an extreme, workerless inquiline?

From Chapter 12:

1. The worker caste is lost.
2. The queen is either replaced by an ergatogyne, or ergatogynes appear together with a continuous series of intergrades connecting them morphologically to the queens.
3. There is a tendency for multiple egg-laying queens to coexist in the same host nest.
4. The queen and male are reduced in size, often dramatically so; in some cases (for example, Teleutomyrmex schneideri, Plagiolepis ampeloni, Plagiolepis xene) the queen is actually smaller than the host worker.
5. The male becomes “pupoid”: its body is thickened, the petiole and postpetiole become much more broadly attached, the genitalia are more externally exposed when not in use, the cuticle becomes thin and depigmented, and the wings are reduced or lost. The extreme examples of this trend are displayed by Anergates atratulus, Pheidole neokohli, and Pheidole acutidens (see Figures 12-19 and 12-20).
6. There is a tendency for the nuptial flights to be curtailed, and to be replaced by mating activity among nestmates (“adelphogamy”) within or near the host nest. Dispersal of the queen afterward is very limited.
7. Probably as a consequence of the curtailment of the nuptial flight just cited, the populations of inquiline species are usually very fragmented and limited in their geographic distribution.
8. The wing venation is reduced.
9. Mouthparts are reduced, with the mandibles becoming smaller and toothless and the palps losing segments. Concomitantly, the inquilines lose the ability to feed themselves and must be sustained by liquid food regurgitated to them by the host workers.
10. Antennal segments are fused and reduced in number.
11. The occiput, or rear portion of the head, of the queen is narrowed.
12. The central nervous system is reduced in size and complexity, usually through reduction of associative centers.
13. The petiole and postpetiole are thickened, especially the latter, and the postpetiole acquires a broader attachment to the gaster.
14. A spine is formed on the lower surface of the postpetiole (the Parasitendorn of Kutter).
15. The propodeal spines (if present in the ancestral species) “melt,” that is, they thicken and often grow shorter, and their tips are blunted.
16. The cuticular sculpturing is reduced or lost altogether over most of the body; in extreme cases the body surface becomes strongly shining.
17. The exoskeleton becomes thinner and less pigmented.
18. Many of the exocrine glands are reduced or lost, a trait already described in some detail in the earlier account of Teleutomyrmex schneideri.
19. The queens become highly attractive to the host workers, which lick them frequently. This is especially true of the older, physogastric individuals, and it appears to be due to the secretion of special attractant substances which are as yet chemically unidentified.
  • 2

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Montag 20. Mai 2019, 22:07

The version of Wilson of the drawing of Linsenmaier. Look for the differences….
  • 1

Dateianhänge
Teleutomyrmex_schneideri_EOW - kopie.png
Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Sonntag 30. Juni 2019, 22:14

An oldy, 2009, still available but the complete numero, Iberomyrmex nr. 1.

But those days you could also download the separate pages...
  • 0

Dateianhänge
Teleuto Capt 001.pdf
(53.2 KiB) 166-mal heruntergeladen
Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Samstag 20. Juli 2019, 17:34

Two oldies but important. First for the story, second for the info host.

Hölldobler, B. K., & Wilson, E. O., 1998, “Journey to the Ants: A Story of Scientific Exploration.” Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 304 pp.
- 304 pp., 124 figs. - [1998-07-21].

Wilson, E. O., 1963, “The Social Biology of Ants.” Annual Review of Entomology, vol. 8, no. 1, 345-368.
- 24 pp., 0 figs. [1963-01-??].

83 references!
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Dienstag 6. August 2019, 22:55

An official literature list of Teleutomyrmex Kutter, 1950.

Baur, A., Buschinger, A., Zimmermann, F. K., 1993, “Molecular cloning and sequencing of 18S rDNA gene fragments from six different ant species.” Insectes Sociaux, vol. 40, p. 325-335.

Baur, A., Chalwatzis, N., Buschinger, A., Zimmermann, F. K., 1995, “Mitochondrial DNA sequences reveal close relationships between social parasitic ants and their host species.” Current Genetics, vol. 28, p. 242-247.

Baur, A., Sanetra, M., Chalwatzis, N., Buschinger, A., Zimmermann, F. K., 1996, “Sequence comparisons of the internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal genes support close relationships between parasitic ants and their respective host species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Insectes Sociaux, vol. 43, p. 53-67.

Bernard, F., 1967 ["1968"], “Faune de l'Europe et du Bassin Méditerranéen. 3. Les fourmis (Hymenoptera Formicidae) d'Europe occidentale et septentrionale.” Paris, Masson, 411 pp.

Blaimer, B. B., Ward, P. S., Schultz, T. R., Fisher, B. L., Brady, S. G., 2018, “Paleotropical Diversification Dominates the Evolution of the Hyperdiverse Ant Tribe Crematogastrini (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Insect Systematics and Diversity, vol. 2, no. 5, art. 3, p. 1-14.

Bolton, B., 1976, “The ant tribe Tetramoriini (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Constituent genera, review of smaller genera and revision of Triglyphothrix Forel.” Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) (Entomology), vol. 34, p. 281-379.

Bolton, B., 1994, “Identification guide to the ant genera of the world.” Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 222 pp.

Bolton, B., 1995, “A taxonomic and zoogeographical census of the extant ant taxa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Journal of Natural History, vol. 29, p. 10371056.

Bolton, B., 1995, “A new general catalogue of the ants of the world.” Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 504 pp.

Bolton, B., 2003, “Synopsis and Classification of Formicidae.” Memoirs of the American Entomological Institute, vol. 71, 370pp

Borowiec, L., 2014, “Catalogue of ants of Europe, the Mediterranean Basin and adjacent regions (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Genus (Wroclaw), vol. 25, no. 1-2, p. 1-340.

Brown, W. L., Jr., 1973, “A comparison of the Hylean and Congo-West African rain forest ant faunas.” P. 161-185 in: Meggers, B. J., Ayensu, E. S., Duckworth, W. D. (ed.), 1973, “Tropical forest ecosystems in Africa and South America: a comparative review.” Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC., viii + 350 pp.

Brun, R., 1952, “Das zentralnervensystem von Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutt. (Hym. Formicid.). III. Mitteilung.” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 25, no. 2, p. 73-86.

Brun, R., 1959, “Le cerveau des fourmis et des insectes en général comme instrument de formation des réflexes conditionnés.” P. 11-25 in: International Union of Biological Sciences, Union Internationale des Sciences Biologiques, Experimental Psychology and Animal Behaviour Section, 1959, “Animal psychology seminars: Strasbourg University, October 1956, and Brussels University, August 1957.” London, Pergamon Press, 148 pp.

Buschinger, A., 1970, “Neue Vorstellungen zur Evolution des Sozialparasitismus und der Dulosis bei Ameisen (Hym., Formicidae).” Biologisches Zentralblatt, vol. 88, no. 3, p. 273-299.

Buschinger, A., 1971, “Zur Verbreitung und Lebensweise sozialparasitischer Ameisen des Schweizer Wallis (Hym., Formicidae).” Zoologischer Anzeiger, vol. 186, no. 1/2, p. 47-59.

Buschinger, A., 1985, “New records of rare parasitic ants (Hym., Form.) in the French Alps.” Insectes Sociaux, vol. 32, no. 3, p. 321-324.

Buschinger, A., 1986, “Evolution of social parasitism in ants.” Trends in Ecology and Evolution, vol. 1, p. 155-160.

Buschinger, A., 1987, “Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter, 1950 and other parasitic ants found in the Pyrenees (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).” Spixiana, vol. 10, no. 1, p. 81-83.

Buschinger, A., 1990, “Evolutionary transitions between types of social parasitism in ants, hypotheses and evidence.” P. 145-146 in: Veeresh, G. K., Mallik, B., Viraktamath, C. A. (eds.), 1990, “Social insects and the environment. Proceedings of the 11th International Congress of IUSSI, 1990.” New Delhi, Oxford & IBH Publishing Co., xxxi + 765 pp.

Buschinger, A., 1990, “Sympatric speciation and radiative evolution of socially parasitic ants. - Heretic hypotheses and their factual background.” Zeitschrift für Zoologische Systematik und Evolutionsforschung, vol. 28, p. 241-260.

Buschinger, A., 1995, “Nicht am Ende: Die “Endameise” Teleutomyrmex schneideri.” Ameisenschutz aktuell, vol. 9, p. 1-7.

Buschinger, A., 1999, “Wiederfund der sozialparasitischen Ameise Teleutomyrmex schneideri in der Schweiz.” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gesellschaft, vol. 72, p. 277-279.

Buschinger, A., 2000, “Die “Endameise” Teleutomyrmex schneideri in der Schweiz: Erster Wiederfund nach 50 Jahren.” Ameisenschutz aktuell, vol. 14, p. 4345.

Buschinger, A., 2009, “Social parasitism among ants: a review (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Myrmecological News, vol. 12, p. 219-235.

Casevitz-Weulersse, J., Galkowski, C., 2009, “Liste actualisée des fourmis de France (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).” Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, vol. 114, no. 4, p. 475-510.

Collingwood, C. A., 1956, “Ant hunting in France.” Entomologist, vol. 89, p. 105-108.

Collingwood, C. A., 1956, “A rare parasitic ant (Hym., Formicidae) in France.” Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, vol. 92, p. 197.

Csősz, S., Radchenko, A., Schulz, A., 2007, “Taxonomic revision of the Palaearctic Tetramorium chefketi species complex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Zootaxa 1405, p. 1-38.

Cuesta, D., García, F., García-Tejero, S. & Espadaler, X., 2009, “Resumen charla: Aportaciones a la biología de Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter, 1950: primer caso de cría en cautividad. [Contributions to the biology of Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter, 1950: first case of keeping in captivity.]” [abstract]. Iberomyrmex, vol. 1, p. 24.

Cuesta-Segura, A.D., Espadaler, X., Garcia Garcia, F., 2017, “Hormigas de los brezales de Calluna cantábricos (NO España) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). [Ants of the Cantabrian Calluna-heathlands (NW Spain) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).]” Iberomyrmex, vol. 9, p. 25-43.

Cuesta-Segura, A. D., García García, F., Catarineu, C., García-Tejero, S., Espadaler, X., 2018, “Actualización de la Distribución y Hospedadores de la Hormiga Parasita Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter, 1950 en la Peninsula Ibérica (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Boletín de la Sociedad Entomológica Aragonesa (S.E.A.), nº 63 (31/12/2018), p. 235–239.

Dlussky, G. M., Fedoseeva, E. B., 1988 (“1987”), “[The origin and early stages of evolution of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).]” P. 70-144 in: Ponomarenko, A. G. (ed.), “[The Creaceous biocenotic crisis and the evolution of insects.]” [In Russian.]. Nauka, Moscow. 231 pp.

Dlussky, G. M., Soyunov, O. S., Zabelin, S. I., 1990 [“1989”], “Muravji Turkmenistana.”, or “[Ants of Turkmenistan.]” [In Russian.]. Ashkabad, Ylym Press, 275 pp.

Espadaler, X., Cuesta, D., 2006, “Notas / Notes. Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter, 1950 en España (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).” Graellsia, vol. 62, nr. 2, p. 261-262.

Espadaker, X., Gómez, K., 2014, “Tetramorium biskrense Forel, 1904 en España y Portugal peninsulares (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).” Boletín de la Sociedad entomológica Aragonesa (SEA), vol. 55, p. 303-305.

Gösswald, K., 1952, “Zur Biologie und Histologie parasitär degenerierter Ameisenarten mit besonderer Berücksichtigung von Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter (Tribus Tetramorini).” Transactions of the IX-th International Congress of Entomology, Amsterdam, August 17-24 (1951), vol. 1, p. 446-448. - His name is spelled “Göszwald” in this publication!

Gösswald, K., 1953, “Histologische Untersuchungen an der arbeiterlosen Ameise Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter (Hym. Formicidae).” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 26, no. 2, p. 81-128.

Hölldobler, B. K., & Wilson, E. O., 1990, “The Ants.” Cambridge, Mass., Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, xiv + 732 pp.

Hölldobler, B. K., & Wilson, E. O., 1998, “Journey to the Ants: A Story of Scientific Exploration.” Cambridge, Mass., Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 304 pp.

Kiran, K., Karaman, C., Lapeva-Gjonova, A. & Aksoy, V., 2017, “Two new species of the “ultimate“ parasitic ant genus Teleutomyrmex Kutter, 1950 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) from the Western Palaearctic.“ Myrmecological News, vol. 25, p. 145-155.

Kusnezov, N., 1954, “Phyletische Bedeutung der Maxillar- und Labialtaster der Ameisen.” Zoologischer Anzeiger, vol. 153, no. 1/2, p. 28-38.

Kutter, H., 1950, “Über eine neue, extrem parasitische Ameise. 1. Mitteilung.” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 23, no. 2, p. 81-94.

Kutter, H., 1950, “Über zwei neue Ameisen.” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 23, no. 3, p. 337-346.

Kutter, H., 1950, “Über Doronomyrmex und verwandte Ameisen. 2. Mitteilung.” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 23, no. 3, p. 347-353.

Kutter, H., 1951, “Von dufttäuschenden Mörderinnen und berittener Königin.” Du: kulturelle Monatsschrift, vol. 11, no. 4, 44-47.

Kutter, H., 1952, “Über Plagiolepis xene Stärcke (Hym. Formicid.).” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 25, no. 2, p. 57-72.

Kutter, H., 1963, “Miscellanea myrmecologica I.” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 36, no. 1 and 2, p. 129-137.

Kutter, H., 1968 ("1967"), “Liste sozialparasitischer Ameisen.” Archives. Institut Grand-Ducal de Luxembourg (n.s.), vol. 33, p. 201-210.

Kutter, H., 1968 (“1969”), “Die sozialparasitischen Ameisen der Schweiz.” Neujahrsblatt herausgegeben von der Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Zürich auf das Jahr 1969, vol. 171, (Ausgegeben am 31. Dezember 1968), p. 1-62.

Kutter, H., 1977, “Hymenoptera, Formicidae.” Insecta Helvetica. Fauna, vol. 6, p. 1-298.

Kutter, H., 1978, “Hymenoptera, Formicidae.” Insecta Helvetica. Fauna, vol. 6a, unpaginated, illustr.

Meyer, G., 1951, “Histologische Untersuchungen an einer arbeiterlosen Ameise Anergates atratulus Schenck.” Inaugural-Dissertation, Institut für Angewandte Zoologie, Würzburg.

Meyer, G. F., 1955, “Untersuchungen an einer parasitischen Ameise (Anergates atratulus Schenck).” Insectes Sociaux, vol. 2, no. 2, p. 163-171.

Reyes López, J., Martínez, A. B., 2011, “Notas Científicas: Nueva cita de Teleutomyrmex kutteri Tinaut, 1990 (Hym., Formicidae) para la Península Ibérica. New record of Teleutomyrmex kutteri Tinaut, 1990 (Hym., Formicidae) from the Iberian Peninsula.” Boletín de la Sociedad Entomológica Aragonesa (S.E.A.), nº. 49, p. 206.

Sanetra, M., 1996, “Systematik, Biologie und Phylogenie westpaläarktischer Ameisen der Tribus Tetramoriini unter besonderer Berücksichtigung molekularer Merkmale (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Thesis, Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, p, 1-229.

Sanetra, M., Buschinger, A., 2000, “Phylogenetic relationships among social parasites and their hosts in the ant tribe Tetramoriini (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” European Journal of Entomology, vol. 97, no. 1, p. 95-117.

Sanetra, M., Felger, S., Buschinger, A., Zimmermann, F. K., 1998, “On the evolutionary history of social parasites in the ant tribe Tetramoriini (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” P. 413 in: Schwarz, M. P., Hogendoorn, K. (eds.), 1998, “Social insects at the turn of the millennium. Proceedings of the XIII International Congress of IUSSI. Adelaide, Australia. 29 December 1998 - 3 January 1999.” Adelaide, XIII Congress of IUSSI, 535 pp.

Sanetra, M., Heinze, J., Buschinger, A., 1994, “Enzyme polymorphism in the ant genus Tetramorium Mayr and its social parasites (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, vol. 22, p. 753-759.

Schlick-Steiner, B. C., Steiner, F. M., Moder, K., Seifert, B., Sanetra, M., Dyreson, E., Stauffer, C., Christian, E., 2005, “A multidisciplinary approach reveals cryptic diversity in Western Palaearctic Tetramorium ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, vol. 40, p. 259-273.

Schönitzer, K., Lawitzky, G., 1987, “A phylogenetic study of the antenna cleaner in Formicidae, Mutillidae, and Tiphiidae (Insecta, Hymenoptera).” Zoomorphology (Berlin), vol 107, no. 5, p. 273-285.

Seifert, B., 1996, “Ameisen: beobachten, bestimmen.” Naturbuch Verlag, Augsburg, 351 pp.

Seifert, B., 2007, “Die Ameisen Mittel- und Nordeuropas.” Lutra Verlags- und Vertriebsgesellschaft, Tauer/Klitten, 368 pp.

Seifert, B., 2018, “The ants of Central and North Europe.” Lutra Verlags- und Vertriebsgesellschaft, Tauer, 407 pp.

Seifert, B., Buschinger, A., Aldawood, A., Antonova, V., Bharti, H., Borowiec, L., Dekoninck, W., Dubovikoff, D., Espadaler, X., Flegr, J. , Georgiadis, C., Heinze, J., Neumeyer, R., Ødegaard, F., Oettler, J., Radchenko, A., Schultz, R., Sharaf, M., Trager, J., Vesnić, A., Wiezik, M., Zettel, H., 2016, “Banning paraphylies and executing Linnaean taxonomy is discordant and reduces the evolutionary and semantic information content of biological nomenclature.” Insectes Sociaux, vol. 63, no. 2, p. 237-242.

Social Insects Specialist Group, 1996a, “Teleutomyrmex kutteri. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 1996: e.T21570A 9301532. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.1996.RLTS.T 21570A9301532.en.”

Sociak Insects Specialist Group, 1996b, “Teleutomyrmex schneideri. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 1996: e.T21569A9301467. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.19 96.RLTS.T21569A9301467.en.”

Steiner, F. M., Seifert, B. , Moder, K., Schlick-Steiner, B. C., 2010, “A multisource solution for a complex problem in biodiversity research: Description of the cryptic ant species Tetramorium alpestre sp.n. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Zoologischer Anzeiger, vol. 249, p. 223-254.

Stumper, R., 1951, “Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter (Hym. Formicid.). II. Mitteilung. Über die Lebensweise der neuen Schmarotzerameise.” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 24, no. 2, p. 129-152.

Stumper, R., 1956, “Etudes myrmécologiques LXXVII. Les sécrétions attractives des reines de fourmis.” Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gessellschaft, vol. 29, no. 4, p.373-380.

Stumper, R., Kutter, H., 1950, “Sur le stade ultime du parasitisme social chez les fourmis, atteint par Teleutomyrmex Schneideri (subtrib. nov.; gen. nov.; spec. nov. Kutter).” Comptes Rendus (Hebdomadaires) des Séances de l'Academie des Sciences, vol. 231, p. 876-878.

Tinaut, A., 1981, “Estudio de los Formícidos de Sierra Nevada.” Tesis Doctoral, Universidad de Granada, 463 pp.

Tinaut, A., 1990, “Teleutomyrmex kutteri, spec. nov. A new species from Sierra Nevada (Granada, Spain).” Spixiana, vol. 13, no. 2, p. 201-208.

Tinaut, A., Ruano, F., Martínez, M. D., 2005, “Biology, Distribution and Taxonomic Status of the Parasitic Ants of the Iberian Peninsula (Hymenoptera: Formicidae, Myrmicinae).” Sociobiology, vol. 46, no. 3, p. 449-489.

Wagner, H. C., Arthofer, W., Seifert, B., Muster, C., Steiner, F. M., Schlick-Steiner, B. C., 2017, “Light at the end of the tunnel: Integrative taxonomy delimits cryptic species in the Tetramorium caespitum complex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Myrmecological News, vol. 25, p. 95–129.

Ward, P. S., Brady, S. G., Fisher, B. L., Schultz, T. R., 2015 (“2014”), “The evolution of myrmicine ants: Phylogeny and biogeography of a hyperdiverse ant clade (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Systematic Entomology, vol. 40, no. 1, p. 61-81. (Article first published online: 23 July 2014).

Ward, P. S., Brady, S. G., Fisher, B. L., Schultz, T. R., 2016, “Phylogenetic classifications are informative, stable, and pragmatic: the case for monophyletic taxa.” Insectes Sociaux, vol. 63, no. 4, p. 489-492.

Wegnez, P., Ignace, D., Lommelen, E., Hardy, M., Bogaert, J., Nilsson, C., 2015, “Redécouverte de Teleutomyrmex schneideri Kutter, 1950 dans les Alpes françaises (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Bulletin de la Société royale belge d’Entomologie/Bulletin van de Koninklijke Belgische Vereniging voor Entomologie, vol. 151, p. 52-57.

Wheeler, G. C., Wheeler, J., 1985, “A simplified conspectus of the Formicidae.” Transactions of the American Entomological Society, vol. 111, p. 255-264.

Wilson, E. O., 1963, “The Social Biology of Ants.” Annual Review of Entomology, vol. 8, no. 1, 345-368.

Wilson, E. O., 1963, “Social modifications related to rareness in ant species.” Evolution, vol. 17, p. 249-253.

Wilson, E. O., 1971, “The insect societies.” Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, x + 548 pp.

Wilson, E. O., 1984, “Tropical social parasites in the ant genus Pheidole, with an analysis of the anatomical parasitic syndrome (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).” Insectes Sociaux, vol. 31, no. 3, p. 316-334.

83 references.
  • 1

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Donnerstag 29. August 2019, 22:35

I did find this back... It is the back-up file of my ants!

2019-08-29_162417.jpg
  • 1

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Merkur » Freitag 30. August 2019, 10:01

Hi Teleutotje,

It‘s an official letter from my institution, thus originally not intended for publication. However, I grant permission herewith since it contains no „secret“
or private information. In fact, I have sent out hundreds of specimens of such rare ants to people who had asked for material, e.g., for comparison with own samples,
and to museums. The host species, though, most probably has to be renamed after the recent revision of the T. caespitum/impurum-group by Wagner et al. (2017).
Wagner, H.C., Arthofer, W., Seifert, B., Muster, C., Steiner, F.M. & Schlick-Steiner, B.C. 2017. Light at the end of the tunnel: Integrative taxonomy delimits cryptic species
in the Tetramorium caespitum complex. Myrmecological News 25: 95-129.
https://myrmecologicalnews.org/cms/inde ... Itemid=407

Regards,
A. Buschinger
  • 1

Suum cuique
Benutzeravatar
Merkur
Beirat
 
Beiträge: 2348
Registriert: Sonntag 6. April 2014, 07:52
Wohnort: Reinheim
Bewertung: 6751

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Freitag 30. August 2019, 16:43

Sorry Prof., didn't know that. If you still want me to remove it you just have to say it.

2 old references I have already a long time to check... and now i've done it. In the first Teleutomyrmex is only mentioned a few times but in the second one……

Buschinger, A., 1974, “Monogynie und Polygynie in Insektensozietäten.” P. 862-896 in: Schmidt, G. H. (ed.), 1974, “Sozialpolymorphismus bei Insekten. Probleme der Kastenbildung im Tierreich.” Stuttgart, Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft mbH, xxiv + 974 pp.

Buschinger, A., 1974, “Polymorphismus und Polyethismus sozialparasitischer Hymenopteren.” P. 897-934 in: Schmidt, G. H. (ed.), 1974, “Sozialpolymorphismus bei Insekten. Probleme der Kastenbildung im Tierreich.” Stuttgart, Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft mbH, xxiv + 974 pp.

85 references.
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Freitag 30. August 2019, 21:47

A pdf-file of my literature list:

Literature list Teleutomyrmex T Off.pdf
(217 KiB) 131-mal heruntergeladen
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Sonntag 15. September 2019, 23:04

I have a small problem…. Don't know anything about the next topic:

Baroni Urbani, C., 1967, “Le distribuzioni geografiche discontinue dei Formicidi mirmecobiotici.” Archivio Botanico e Biogeografico Italiano, vol. 43 [=(4)12]: 355-365.

Can someone help me please???
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Mittwoch 25. September 2019, 21:44

Although I don't know anything abouy Baroni Urbani, C., 1967, I'll take it in my list.

And another one:

García, F., 2019, “Parásitos y myrmecófilos. Hormigas parásitas sociales ibéricas.” LaMarabunta digital, Nueva Edición, Número 4, Junio 2019: p. 27-44.

Brings the total on 87 references.

For Garcia see:

https://mirmecologia.jimdo.com/app/down ... 1563149742
or
https://mirmecologia.jimdo.com/trabajos-mirmecológicos/revista-lamarabunta-digital/
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Freitag 27. September 2019, 11:04

The new pdf....

Literature list Teleutomyrmex T Off New 1.pdf
(217.9 KiB) 95-mal heruntergeladen
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Merkur » Freitag 27. September 2019, 14:26

Dear Teleutotje,

The regular spelling of Gößwald is with "ß". Since in other languages the „ß“ doesn‘t exist, it kann be written as „ss“ (in German texts, too, particulary when written in capitals: GÖSSWALD).
sz“, pronounced as „eszet“ means the same as „scharfes s“.

Teleutomyrmex is mentioned also in :
Gösswald, K. (1954/1955): Unsere Ameisen 1.+ 2. Teil, Kosmos, Stuttgart
Gösswald, K. (1985): Organisation und Leben der Ameisen, Stuttgart 1985, ISBN 3-8047-0691-6

Best wishes,
Merkur
  • 1

Suum cuique
Benutzeravatar
Merkur
Beirat
 
Beiträge: 2348
Registriert: Sonntag 6. April 2014, 07:52
Wohnort: Reinheim
Bewertung: 6751

Re: The extreme, workerless inquilines.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Samstag 28. September 2019, 11:46

Dear Prof.,

Naturally I did know G. '85 because I have that book. The only thing I find about that is that it uses a lot of old pictures. For the rest: Marvelous! Great.

The other two I do not know them. Didn't find any copies of them.

I putted them all 3 in the new list (now 90 references!). There are more books and articles that mentions Teleutomyrmex but only as a reference or small mention of it BUT these I do not include in it. Just a few general mentions of a few great ones...
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 480
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Gent, Belgium
Bewertung: 621

VorherigeNächste

Zurück zu Wissenschaft und Medien

Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 11 Gäste

Reputation System ©'